The Washington Death with Dignity Act went into effect on March 5, 2009. Year prior to that momentous day and for years after, Compassion & Choices has been working to ensure terminally ill eligible adults who wish to use this compassionate end can do so. 

2020

In 2020, Compassion & Choices and End of Life Washington worked with lawmakers in the state to advance legislation that would improve the Washington Death with Dignity Act. Due to concerns related to the COVID-19 pandemic, both bills stalled in the legislature. Compassion & Choices is working with lawmakers in 2021 to advance these important bills. Read more about these two important bills..   

  • HB 2326 was introduced January 9, 2020 as an amendment to the existing law. If passed, it would require every hospital to submit its policy regarding medical aid in dying to the WA Department of Health. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, HB 2326 stalled in the legislature before its third reading.
  • HB 2419 was introduced January 14, 2020 requiring the study of barriers to the use of the Washington Death with Dignity Act. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and concerns about the state’s budget, Governor Inslee vetoed HB 2419.

2016

A medical aid in dying law is meaningless if people cannot access it. Our campaign in Washington educates health professionals about the law, encourages healthcare systems to adopt supportive policies that enable patients to access their rights under the law and promotes public understanding.

2015

In October of 2015, Compassion & Choices of Washington changed its name to End of Life Washington. Our relationship changed from affiliate to partner, and we continue to work collaboratively. End of Life Choices Washington is the lead organization helping patients to navigate the law, and both organizations pursue efforts to improve existing laws in the state of Washington.

2009

The Washington Death with Dignity Act, co-authored by Compassion & Choices former president (now President Emerita/Senior Adviser) Barbara Coombs Lee, went into effect on March 5. 2009.

2008

Former Washington Governor Booth Gardner filed a ballot initiative to authorize medical aid in dying with the Secretary of State’s office in Washington on January 24, 2008. A month later the It’s My Decision Committee was renamed Yes on I-1000.  The coalition partners launched an aggressive signature-gathering effort and on July 2, Gov. Gardner delivered to the Secretary of State almost 100,000 signatures more than was needed to make it on the ballot. On August 13, 2008, the Secretary of State certified Initiative 1000. As a result, in November, the voters of Washington would be given an opportunity to authorize medical aid in dying, which they did! 

On November 4, 2008, 57% of Washington voters voted in favor of the Washington Death with Dignity Act, making it the second state to authorize medical aid in dying. The Washington Death with Dignity Act went into effect on March 5, 2009.   

Following passage of the law, Compassion & Choices and its affiliate in Washington launched programs to ensure that patients were able to access medical aid in dying.  Over the years, staff and volunteers have conducted hundreds of presentations for social workers, nurses, physicians, attorneys and the general public.

2007

On August 23, 2007, the campaign officially launched, when the Coalition voted to establish the It’s My Decision Committee. Compassion & Choices and Compassion & Choices Washington each donated $200,000 in seed money to jump start the campaign as did the other coalition partners. The legislation in Washington was modeled after the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, which Compassion & Choices president Barbara Coombs Lee co-authored.

2006

In 2006, a coalition—individuals from the state of Washington led by Governor Booth Gardner, Compassion & Choices, and Compassion & Choices of Washington and Death with Dignity National Center, —first convened on February 24, 2006, to discuss a potential Washington Death with Dignity initiative. Polls showed support for Death with Dignity among state residents stood at 64%.

2005

In 2005, because their missions were becoming more similar, Compassion in Dying Federation and End of Life Choices merged and became Compassion & Choices. The Washington chapter of End of Life Choices became Compassion & Choices Washington.

Pre-2005

Members of the Hemlock Society who wanted to provide direct volunteer service to dying people split off and founded Compassion in Dying in Washington State in 1993. That organization provided consultation to dying patients, supported state-based advocacy for ch0ice.